Coalition hosted its annual conference

06 June, 2023

The Information Integrity Coalition hosted its first annual conference on June 6, focusing on Russian hybrid threats, Kremlin’s various vectors of influence and existing (or lack of) Georgia's state response. The conference featured several panel discussions by coalition members, representatives of policymakers, academia, media, and other experts.   

Coalition members presented their joint research on the state response to disinformation and hybrid threats at the first panel of the conference, which evaluated the state of Georgia's policy in response to hybrid threats. This session analyzed measures taken by the Georgian government to counter the multifaceted challenges posed by hybrid warfare. Following panels explored different avenues of Kremlin influence, such as - the role of money, corruption, and Russian capital in Georgian economy, and weaponization of history and distortion of memory and identity issue for propagandistic narratives. Coalition member organizations showcased both the results of their work in these areas, as well as discussed their recommendations and remedies. The conference was wrapped up with an engaging exchange on how to build resilience against upcoming challenges in terms of disinformation and propaganda. 

The conference aimed to outline the ecosystem of malign influences in the information space, discuss existing responses, foster a comprehensive understanding of the evolving challenges Georgia faces, and explore the actions key actors should take to enhance resilience and ensure information integrity. The conference brought together over 120 participants, including students, civil society organizations, researchers, activists, media representatives, politicians, and international partners. Throughout the event, engaging discussions were held, and the audience remained actively involved across all four panels. 

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